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the coordinated bomb blasts in india's financial capital. >> ifill: political editor david chalian takes us inside president obama's record- breaking 2012 money haul. >> woodruff: paul solman reports on an ohio company that guarantees its workers jobs even during a recession. >> a vast, century old lincoln electric in the heart of the rust belt, workers average $28 an hour and yet there hasn't been a layoff here in at least 70 years. >> ifill: and we check in on how the pentagon is repealing its "don't ask, don't tell" policy starting with the acceptance of gay recruits. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them
, number one. number 100 and number 2,000, why the cricket match between england and india is heading for the history books. >> hello. an emergency summit ads eurozone leaders get underway in brussels shortly to try to resolve the debt crisis spreading across the zone. the most urgent need is to protect greece from defaulting on its debt, but the challenge is to strengthen the position of countries such as ireland and portugal and to avoid further contagion of this debt crisis to spain and italy. it's emerged that france and germany have agreed on the best steps ahead. from brussels, our europe correspondent chris morris reports. >> for the past year, whenever european leaders have met, there's been one issue at the top of the agenda again and again and again. trying to fix the euro. the survival of the single currency has now been called into question. there are increasingly urgent appeals to eurozone leaders to act decisively. >> they have said they will do what it takes to ensure the stability of the area. well, now is the time to make good on that promise. >> all eyes on the bigge
they captured the town in 1995. at least 67 people were killed in a train crash in northern india on sunday. police said more than 200 other passengers were injured when the train derailed. rescue he is worked through the night to reach people trapped in the wreckage. the united states' top military officer has expressed concerns thatter iter to the disputes in the south china sea could lead to an unexpected outbreak of violence in the region. admiral mike mullen is on a visit to china, which is embroiled in rowes with the philippines and vietnam about territory. the united states has suspended $800 million of military aid to pakistan. tensions were already high before the al qaeda leader osama bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid in an army raid. more recently, 100 military trainers have been expelled, and they threatened to shut down a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are acc
, india, brazil, and south africa accept make it work. >> rose: in your opinion china, >> >> yes. >> rose: you came away with what sense of their ambition? >> well, this is clearly a country with an enormous national will to... >> rose: solve internal problems? >> to develop, to become wealthy and powerful and to overcome what they see as a century and a half of national humiliation at the hands of the west. that's a huge drive. how it does that i think this is a country which sees many options and could go several different ways. i mean, the one thing almost everyone you speak in china agrees on the it's not going to have the same system in 20 year's time that it has today. whereas in the united states you think you have basically the same system that you've had for a few centuries and more. >> i think ai wei wei had said this. that you do not expect reform to comele from the generation that's now takingower that replaces hu jintao and wen jiabao but you expect genuine reform to come from the next generation, which could mean literally eight ars from now. >> right. >> rose: because the n
as opped to fundamentals. the emerging markets, developing markets, gynea-- china, brazil, india all have better growth prospects in terms of a rather underdeveloped consumer sector and the ability to grow from that standpoint versus the developed markets. in addition they have trillions of dollars worth of reserves whereas the developed countries are in hawk to those nations so from those standpoints the developing countries are in much better shape going forward over the next five to ten years as opposed to the developed. >> gillian? >> onef the most interesting things that moodies said this week when it gave warning that it might downgrade the u.s. debt fm aaa was that it was leaving the ratings of companies, large american companies unchanged. and essentially the underlying, somethg you are already seeing in market prices where in the markets right now the risk attacks to sereign debt is actually higher than some of the big, solid american companies or similar patent in europe as well. and that's very unusual. but essentially what moodies was saying and what you are seeing in the mark
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5